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Post Radiation Pain

We Treat Radiation Pain and Adhesions Naturally

Adhesions that form due to radiation therapy can cause moderate to severe pain or dysfunction. These adhesions act like a glue, adhering irradiated tissues at organs, muscles, bones and connective tissues.

Adhesions that form due to radiation therapy can cause moderate to severe pain or dysfunction. These adhesions act like a glue, adhering irradiated tissues at organs, muscles, bones and connective tissues.

Radiation therapy can cause massive scarring or adhesions deep in the body. Clear Passage is a world leader with over two decades of experience decreasing and eliminating adhesions. Studies published in peer-reviewed U.S. and international medical journals found that this manual physio/physical therapy deceased pain and increased function in various areas of the body where tissues were previously diagnosed as “beyond repair.” Complete the online Request Consultation form to receive a free phone consultation with an expert therapist and learn more.


Free Informational Adhesions eBook

Radiation Pain Overview

At a microscopic level, tiny cross-links, the building blocks of adhesions, attach irradiated tissues with a tensile strength approaching 2,000 pounds per square inch (140 kilograms per square centimeter).

At a microscopic level, tiny cross-links, the building blocks of adhesions, attach irradiated tissues with a tensile strength approaching 2,000 pounds per square inch (140 kilograms per square centimeter).


Radiation therapy, frequently prescribed to treat cancer, can cause adhesions (internal scars) to form in the body. Adhesions can cause moderate to severe pain or dysfunction. Radiation therapy adhesions act like a very strong glue, adhering the irradiated tissues to nearby organs, muscles, bones and connective tissues.

Where adhesions occur, organs and muscles can become bound together, losing their ability to function normally. Pain or other symptoms are frequent results. Symptoms may appear far from the site of the original trauma, as adhesions spread to neighboring organs.

Treatment for Radiation Pain (Wurn Technique)

Stepping back in magnification, cross-links bind the cells of individual muscles or organs to each other, creating pain or immobility within those structures.

Stepping back in magnification, cross-links bind the cells of individual muscles or organs to each other, creating pain or immobility within those structures.

We have treated countless patients who suffer from post-radiation adhesions. Our work, the Wurn Technique®, was developed by physical therapist Belinda Wurn and her therapist husband, Larry, over 20 years ago, to treat the adhesions that formed in Belinda’s body after she underwent surgery and radiation therapy to her pelvis. The radiation therapy helped cure Belinda’s cancer, but left her with adhesions that caused unexplained pain and organ dysfunction in various parts of her body.

With over 20 years of study and development, the primary goal of the Wurn Technique® is to increase mobility, decrease pain and restore function to adhered areas of the body. We are highly skilled in palpating restricted areas of the body. Our work appears to reduce adhesions, decrease pain and improve soft tissue mobility.

We treat the soft tissues of the abdomen and pelvis with our hands, using gentle, site-specific therapy to decrease adhesions affecting muscles, organs, their connective tissues and their attachments. Our conservative, non-surgical approach has been very effective in treating pain and dysfunction.

 

In this broader view, cross-links join to create curtains or ropes of adhesions that bind large structures together – often causing significant problems. Doctors and patients may have difficulty diagnosing the problem because adhesions do not generally appear on diagnostic tests – MRI, CT or X-rays.

In this broader view, cross-links join to create curtains or ropes of adhesions that bind large structures together – often causing significant problems. Doctors and patients may have difficulty diagnosing the problem because adhesions do not generally appear on diagnostic tests – MRI, CT or X-rays.

Other Treatments for Radiation Pain

Other than pain-masking drugs, we are not aware of other options for people who suffer from pain after radiation therapy. We have found that unless we address the strong, underlying adhesions and scars that pull on pain-sensitive structures, patients are generally unable to find relief.

Most physicians agree that surgery to decrease radiation pain is a treatment of last resort. While surgery can address adhesions and other mechanical problems, formation of new post-surgical adhesions can trap patients in an endless “surgery-adhesion-surgery” cycle.

 

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